Sale!

Linked Lists CS 1331 Extra Credit Homework solved

$35.00 $21.00

Category: You will receive a download link of the .ZIP file upon Payment

Description

5/5 - (1 vote)

Overview
This homework is an opportunity to make up points lost on previous
assignments. It is optional, but highly recommended that you complete it, as it will help
prepare you for CS 1332. By the time you’ve completed this assignment, you should
have a basic grasp of the linked list data structure.
Linked List
A linked list is a data structure. Like an array, a linked list holds a series of objects
that are logically grouped together. Linked lists differ from arrays in that they can hold
an arbitrary amount of data without the overhead of having to create larger arrays and
copying already existing elements into them. Additionally, the design of linked lists
implies an order to elements placed into them, as we will see in the example below.
Linked lists are made up of a series of nodes, which are linked together to form a
list, hence their name. A node is nothing more that a reference to an object of the type
the list should hold and a reference to the next node.
By keeping a reference to the node at the front, or “head”, of the list, and linking
it to subsequently linked nodes, we create a linked list.
A Node: data
data data data data data
head
Note that the nodes don’t all have to contain
the same data, just data of the same type.
You may be wondering what the node at the end of the list is linked to. There are
a variety of ways to handle ending the list, but for this assignment the last node in the
list will be linked to null.
Traversing the List
Traversing a linked list is simple. As the linked list only has a reference to the
head, we start with that node. To reach a particular ordinal node, we walk from node to
node until the node with the position we were looking for is reached (or we find the end
of the list).
Consider the scenario in which we want to find the data in the 3rd node
(remember that we start counting at 0) of the list. We inspect the nodes one at a time, the
currently inspected node starting at the head of the list.
This is obviously not the node we want, so we move to the next node. This is
accomplished by setting the currentNode equal to the next node in the list.
data data data data data
head
null
data data data data data
head
null
currentNode
off by: 3
data data data data data
head
null
currentNode
off by: 3
We repeat this until we’ve reached the 3rd node.
Having found our node, we return its data.
Adding to the List
Adding to the front of the list is the most simple case. For a list of any length,
adding the front of the list involves creating a new node, setting its next to be the
current head, and then setting the head reference to the new node.
data data data data data
head
null
currentNode
off by: 2
data data data data data
head
null
currentNode
off by: 1
data data data data data
head
null
currentNode
off by: 0
data
head
… data
head
… new
data
newNode
data …
head
new
data
To insert a node at an arbitrary position in the list, first traverse to the position
the node should be. Then set the new node’s next to be the previous node’s next and the
previous node’s next to the new node.
If the next node in the list is null, then the new node’s next will be null.
Removing from the List
Removing from the list is exactly the opposite of adding. The node previous to
the node being removed has its next set to be the node after the removed node.
… data data …
new
data
newNode
… data data …
new
data
newNode
… new
data … data data
Your Assignment, Should You Choose to Accept It
We have provided a skeleton class with empty methods. You are to fill in the
methods with code as specified by the javadocs for each method. Additionally, create a
Test class with a main() method, in which you must test all of the methods of the
StringLinkedList class.
This assignment is due Monday, December 10th (the first day of finals week).
Deliverables:
•StringLinkedList.java
•Test.java