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1 Assignment 2 – Building CNNs
In this assignment we will be coding the building blocks for the convolutional neural network and putting
them together to train a CNN on the CIFAR2 dataset (taking just 2 classes (airplane and bird) from the
original 10 classes).
Please note that we have changed to using just 2 classes (airplane and bird) from the original
CIFAR10 dataset. get cifar2 data code in data utils.py will load the 2-class data accordingly.
We would like to credit the Stanford CS231n team as much of our code backbone is from their Assignment
2. The teaching team at Stanford has kindly agreed for us to adapt their assignment and code. You will
find that we adopt a modular design of the code. You will implement different layer types in isolation and
then combine them together into models with different architectures.
For each layer we will implement a forward and a backward function. The forward function will receive
inputs, weights, and other parameters and will return both an output and a cache object storing data needed
for the backward pass, like this:
def layer_forward(x, w):
“”” Receive inputs x and weights w “””
# Do some computations …
z = # … some intermediate value
# Do some more computations …
out = # the output
cache = (x, w, z, out) # Values we need to compute gradients
return out, cache
The backward pass will receive upstream derivatives and the cache object, and will return gradients with
respect to the inputs and weights, like this:
def layer_backward(dout, cache):
“””
Receive derivative of loss with respect to outputs and cache,
and compute derivative with respect to inputs.
“””
# Unpack cache values
x, w, z, out = cache
# Use values in cache to compute derivatives
dx = # Derivative of loss with respect to x
dw = # Derivative of loss with respect to w
return dx, dw
1
After implementing a bunch of layers this way, we will be able to easily combine them to build classifiers
with different architectures.
2 Submission details
Since we have not restricted the usage of other programming languages, our submission format will need to
be in output text form (similar to the previous assignment). For each question, we will provide the input
arguments and you have to provide a text file containing the corresponding output, to a certain precision.
This iPython notebook serves to: – explain the questions – explain the function APIs – providing helper
functions to piece functions together and check your code – providing helper functions to load and save arrays
as csv files for submission
Hence, we strongly encourage you to use Python for this assignment as you will only need to code the
relevant parts and it will reduce your workload significantly. For non-Python users, some of the cells here
are for illustration purpose, you do not have to replicate the demos.
The input files will be in the input files folder, and your output files should go into output files
folder. Similar to assignment 1, use np.float32 if you are using Python and use at least 16 significant
figures for your outputs. For Python users, if you use the accompanying printing functions when using
np.float32 variables, you should be ok.
In [ ]: # A bit of setup
from __future__ import print_function
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from code_base.classifiers.cnn import *
from code_base.data_utils import get_CIFAR2_data
from code_base.gradient_check import eval_numerical_gradient_array, eval_numerical_gradient
from code_base.layers import *
from code_base.solver import Solver
%matplotlib inline
plt.rcParams[’figure.figsize’] = (10.0, 8.0) # set default size of plots
plt.rcParams[’image.interpolation’] = ’nearest’
plt.rcParams[’image.cmap’] = ’gray’
# for auto-reloading external modules
# see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1907993/autoreload-of-modules-in-ipython
%load_ext autoreload
%autoreload 2
def rel_error(x, y):
“”” returns relative error “””
return np.max(np.abs(x – y) / (np.maximum(1e-8, np.abs(x) + np.abs(y))))
In [ ]: # Load the (preprocessed) CIFAR2 (airplane and bird) data.
data = get_CIFAR2_data()
for k, v in data.items():
print(’%s: ’ % k, v.shape)
3 Convolution: Forward pass
In the file code base/layers.py, implement the forward pass for a convolutional layer in the function
conv forward.
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The input consists of N data points, each with C channels, height H and width W. We convolve each
input with F different filters, where each filter spans all C channels and has height HH and width HH.
Input: – x: Input data of shape (N, C, H, W)
• w: Filter weights of shape (F, C, HH, WW)
• b: Biases, of shape (F,)
conv param contains the stride and padding width:
• ‘stride’: The number of pixels between adjacent receptive fields in the horizontal and vertical directions.
• ‘pad’: The number of pixels that will be used to zero-pad the input in each x-y direction. We will use
the same definition in lecture notes 3b, slide 13 (ie. same padding on both sides). Hence p=2 means a
1-pixel border of padding with zeros.
WARNING: Please implement the matrix product method of convolution as shown in Lecture notes
4, slide 38. The naive version of implementing a sliding window will be too slow when you try to train the
whole CNN in later sections.
You can test your implementation by running the following:
In [ ]: x_shape = (2, 3, 4, 4)
w_shape = (3, 3, 4, 4)
x = np.linspace(-0.1, 0.5, num=np.prod(x_shape)).reshape(x_shape)
w = np.linspace(-0.2, 0.3, num=np.prod(w_shape)).reshape(w_shape)
b = np.linspace(-0.1, 0.2, num=3)
conv_param = {’stride’: 2, ’pad’: 2}
out, _ = conv_forward(x, w, b, conv_param)
correct_out = np.array([[[[-0.08759809, -0.10987781],
[-0.18387192, -0.2109216 ]],
[[ 0.21027089, 0.21661097],
[ 0.22847626, 0.23004637]],
[[ 0.50813986, 0.54309974],
[ 0.64082444, 0.67101435]]],
[[[-0.98053589, -1.03143541],
[-1.19128892, -1.24695841]],
[[ 0.69108355, 0.66880383],
[ 0.59480972, 0.56776003]],
[[ 2.36270298, 2.36904306],
[ 2.38090835, 2.38247847]]]])
# Compare your output to ours; difference should be around 2e-8
print(’Testing conv_forward’)
print(’difference: ’, rel_error(out, correct_out))
FOR SUBMISSION: Submit the corresponding output from your foward convolution for
the given input arguments. Load the files conv forward in x.csv, conv forward in w.csv and
conv forward in b.csv, they contain the input arguments for the x, w and b respectively
and are flattened to a 1D array in C-style, row-major order (see numpy.ravel for details:
https://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.ravel.html).
For Python users, you can use the code below to load and reshape the arrays to feed into your
conv forward function. Code is also provided to flatten the array and save your output to a csv file.
For users of other programming languages, you have to submit the output file conv forward out.csv which
contains the flattened output of conv forward. The array must be flattened in row-major order or else our
automated scripts will mark your outputs as incorrect.
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In [ ]: x_shape = (2, 3, 6, 6)
w_shape = (3, 3, 4, 4)
x = np.loadtxt(’./input_files/conv_forward_in_x.csv’, delimiter=’,’)
x = x.reshape(x_shape)
w = np.loadtxt(’./input_files/conv_forward_in_w.csv’, delimiter=’,’)
w = w.reshape(w_shape)
b = np.loadtxt(’./input_files/conv_forward_in_b.csv’, delimiter=’,’)
conv_param = {’stride’: 2, ’pad’: 2}
out, _ = conv_forward(x, w, b, conv_param)
np.savetxt(’./output_files/conv_forward_out.csv’, out.ravel(), delimiter=’,’)
4 Aside: Image processing via convolutions
In slide 32 of lecture 4, we mentioned that convolutions are able to perform low-level image processing
such as edge detection. Here, we manually set up filters that perform common image processing operations
(grayscale conversion and edge detection) and test them on two images. If your forward convolution pass
works correctly, the visualization should make sense.
In [ ]: from scipy.misc import imread, imresize
kitten, puppy = imread(’kitten.jpg’), imread(’puppy.jpg’)
# kitten is wide, and puppy is already square
d = kitten.shape[1] – kitten.shape[0]
kitten_cropped = kitten[:, d//2:-d//2, :]
img_size = 200 # Make this smaller if it runs too slow
x = np.zeros((2, 3, img_size, img_size))
x[0, :, :, :] = imresize(puppy, (img_size, img_size)).transpose((2, 0, 1))
x[1, :, :, :] = imresize(kitten_cropped, (img_size, img_size)).transpose((2, 0, 1))
# Set up a convolutional weights holding 2 filters, each 3×3
w = np.zeros((2, 3, 3, 3))
# The first filter converts the image to grayscale.
# Set up the red, green, and blue channels of the filter.
w[0, 0, :, :] = [[0, 0, 0], [0, 0.3, 0], [0, 0, 0]]
w[0, 1, :, :] = [[0, 0, 0], [0, 0.6, 0], [0, 0, 0]]
w[0, 2, :, :] = [[0, 0, 0], [0, 0.1, 0], [0, 0, 0]]
# Second filter detects horizontal edges in the blue channel.
w[1, 2, :, :] = [[1, 2, 1], [0, 0, 0], [-1, -2, -1]]
# Vector of biases. We don’t need any bias for the grayscale
# filter, but for the edge detection filter we want to add 128
# to each output so that nothing is negative.
b = np.array([0, 128])
# Compute the result of convolving each input in x with each filter in w,
# offsetting by b, and storing the results in out.
out, _ = conv_forward(x, w, b, {’stride’: 1, ’pad’: 2})
def imshow_noax(img, normalize=True):
“”” Tiny helper to show images as uint8 and remove axis labels “””
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if normalize:
img_max, img_min = np.max(img), np.min(img)
img = 255.0 * (img – img_min) / (img_max – img_min)
plt.imshow(img.astype(’uint8’))
plt.gca().axis(’off’)
# Show the original images and the results of the conv operation
plt.subplot(2, 3, 1)
imshow_noax(puppy, normalize=False)
plt.title(’Original image’)
plt.subplot(2, 3, 2)
imshow_noax(out[0, 0])
plt.title(’Grayscale’)
plt.subplot(2, 3, 3)
imshow_noax(out[0, 1])
plt.title(’Edges’)
plt.subplot(2, 3, 4)
imshow_noax(kitten_cropped, normalize=False)
plt.subplot(2, 3, 5)
imshow_noax(out[1, 0])
plt.subplot(2, 3, 6)
imshow_noax(out[1, 1])
plt.show()
5 Convolution: Backward pass
Implement the backward pass for the convolution operation in the function conv backward in the file
code base/layers.py.
When you are done, run the following to check your backward pass with a numeric gradient check.
In gradient checking, to get an approximate gradient for a parameter, we vary that parameter by a small
amount (while keeping rest of parameters constant) and note the difference in the network loss. Dividing
the difference in network loss by the amount we varied the parameter gives us an approximation for the
gradient. We repeat this process for all the other parameters to obtain our numerical gradient. Note that
gradient checking is a slow process (2 forward propagations per parameter) and should only be used to check
your backpropagation!
More links on gradient checking:
http://ufldl.stanford.edu/tutorial/supervised/DebuggingGradientChecking/
https://www.coursera.org/learn/machine-learning/lecture/Y3s6r/gradient-checking
FOR SUBMISSION: Submit the corresponding output from your backward convolution for
the given input arguments. Load the files conv backward in x.csv, conv backward in w.csv,
conv backward in b.csv and conv backward in dout.csv, they contain the input arguments for the dx,
dw, db and dout respectively and are flattened to a 1D array in C-style, row-major order.
The input arguments have the following dimensions: – x: Input data of shape (N, C, H, W) – w: Filter
weights of shape (F, C, HH, WW) – b: Biases, of shape (F,) – dout: Upstream derivatives.
conv param contains the stride and padding width:
• ‘stride’: The number of pixels between adjacent receptive fields in the horizontal and vertical directions.
• ‘pad’: The number of pixels that will be used to zero-pad the input in each x-y direction. We will use
the same definition in lecture notes 3b, slide 13 (ie. same padding on both sides).
For Python users, you can use the code below to load and reshape the arrays. Note that the code
runs conv forward first and saves the relevant arrays in cache for conv backward. Code is also provided
flatten and save your output to a csv file. For users of other programming languages, you have to submit
5
the output files conv backward out dx.csv, conv backward out dw.csv, conv backward out db.csv which
contains the flattened outputs of conv backward. The array must be flattened in row-major order or else
our automated scripts will mark your outputs as incorrect.
In [ ]: x_shape = (4, 3, 5, 5)
w_shape = (2, 3, 3, 3)
dout_shape = (4, 2, 5, 5)
x = np.loadtxt(’./input_files/conv_backward_in_x.csv’)
x = x.reshape(x_shape)
w = np.loadtxt(’./input_files/conv_backward_in_w.csv’)
w = w.reshape(w_shape)
b = np.loadtxt(’./input_files/conv_backward_in_b.csv’)
dout = np.loadtxt(’./input_files/conv_backward_in_dout.csv’)
dout = dout.reshape(dout_shape)
conv_param = {’stride’: 1, ’pad’: 2}
dx_num = eval_numerical_gradient_array(lambda x: conv_forward(x, w, b, conv_param)[0], x, dout)
dw_num = eval_numerical_gradient_array(lambda w: conv_forward(x, w, b, conv_param)[0], w, dout)
db_num = eval_numerical_gradient_array(lambda b: conv_forward(x, w, b, conv_param)[0], b, dout)
out, cache = conv_forward(x, w, b, conv_param)
dx, dw, db = conv_backward(dout, cache)
np.savetxt(’./output_files/conv_backward_out_dx.csv’, dx.ravel())
np.savetxt(’./output_files/conv_backward_out_dw.csv’, dw.ravel())
np.savetxt(’./output_files/conv_backward_out_db.csv’, db.ravel())
# Your errors should be less than 1e-8’
print(’Testing conv_backward function’)
print(’dx error: ’, rel_error(dx, dx_num))
print(’dw error: ’, rel_error(dw, dw_num))
print(’db error: ’, rel_error(db, db_num))
6 ReLU layer: forward and backward
A convolution layer is usually followed by an elementwise activation function. Since you have derived backpropagation for the ReLU activation function in Assignment 1, we will provide the functions relu forward
and relu backward in code base/layers.py. Read through the function code and make sure you understand the derivation. The code for affine (fully connected) layers to be used at the end of CNN is also
provided.
7 Max pooling: Forward
Implement the forward pass for the max-pooling operation in the function max pool forward in the file
code base/layers.py.
Check your implementation by running the following:
In [ ]: x_shape = (2, 3, 4, 4)
x = np.linspace(-0.3, 0.4, num=np.prod(x_shape)).reshape(x_shape)
pool_param = {’pool_width’: 2, ’pool_height’: 2, ’stride’: 2}
out, _ = max_pool_forward(x, pool_param)
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correct_out = np.array([[[[-0.26315789, -0.24842105],
[-0.20421053, -0.18947368]],
[[-0.14526316, -0.13052632],
[-0.08631579, -0.07157895]],
[[-0.02736842, -0.01263158],
[ 0.03157895, 0.04631579]]],
[[[ 0.09052632, 0.10526316],
[ 0.14947368, 0.16421053]],
[[ 0.20842105, 0.22315789],
[ 0.26736842, 0.28210526]],
[[ 0.32631579, 0.34105263],
[ 0.38526316, 0.4 ]]]])
# Compare your output with ours. Difference should be around 1e-8.
print(’Testing max_pool_forward function:’)
print(’difference: ’, rel_error(out, correct_out))
FOR SUBMISSION: Submit the corresponding output from your forward maxpool for the given input
arguments.
Inputs: – x: Input data, of shape (N, C, H, W) – pool param: dictionary with the following keys: –
‘pool height’: The height of each pooling region – ‘pool width’: The width of each pooling region – ‘stride’:
The distance between adjacent pooling regions
In [ ]: x_shape = (3, 3, 8, 8)
pool_param = {’pool_width’: 2, ’pool_height’: 2, ’stride’: 2}
x = np.loadtxt(’./input_files/maxpool_forward_in_x.csv’)
x = x.reshape(x_shape)
out, _ = max_pool_forward(x, pool_param)
np.savetxt(’./output_files/maxpool_forward_out.csv’, out.ravel())
8 Max pooling: Backward
Implement the backward pass for the max-pooling operation in the function max pool backward in the file
code base/layers.py.
FOR SUBMISSION: Submit the corresponding output from your backward maxpool for the given
input arguments.
Inputs: – x: Input data, of shape (N, C, H, W) – pool param: dictionary with the following keys: –
‘pool height’: The height of each pooling region – ‘pool width’: The width of each pooling region – ‘stride’:
The distance between adjacent pooling regions – dout: Upstream derivatives
In [ ]: x_shape = (3, 2, 10, 10)
dout_shape = (3, 2, 5, 5)
x = np.loadtxt(’./input_files/maxpool_backward_in_x.csv’)
x = x.reshape(x_shape)
dout = np.loadtxt(’./input_files/maxpool_backward_in_dout.csv’)
dout = dout.reshape(dout_shape)
pool_param = {’pool_height’: 2, ’pool_width’: 2, ’stride’: 2}
out, cache = max_pool_forward(x, pool_param)
dx = max_pool_backward(dout, cache)
np.savetxt(’./output_files/maxpool_backward_out.csv’, dx.ravel())
7
9 Convolutional “sandwich” layers
Here we introduce the concept of “sandwich” layers that combine multiple operations into commonly used
patterns. In the file code base/layer utils.py you will find sandwich layers that implement a few commonly used patterns for convolutional networks. With a modular design, it is very convenient to combine
layers according to your network architecture.
The following code test the sandwich layers of conv relu pool forward, conv relu pool backward,
conv relu forward and conv relu backward.
In [ ]: from code_base.layer_utils import conv_relu_pool_forward, conv_relu_pool_backward
np.random.seed(231)
x = np.random.randn(2, 3, 16, 16)
w = np.random.randn(3, 3, 3, 3)
b = np.random.randn(3,)
dout = np.random.randn(2, 3, 8, 8)
conv_param = {’stride’: 1, ’pad’: 2}
pool_param = {’pool_height’: 2, ’pool_width’: 2, ’stride’: 2}
out, cache = conv_relu_pool_forward(x, w, b, conv_param, pool_param)
dx, dw, db = conv_relu_pool_backward(dout, cache)
dx_num = eval_numerical_gradient_array(lambda x: conv_relu_pool_forward(x, w, b, conv_param, pool_param)[0], x, dout)
dw_num = eval_numerical_gradient_array(lambda w: conv_relu_pool_forward(x, w, b, conv_param, pool_param)[0], w, dout)
db_num = eval_numerical_gradient_array(lambda b: conv_relu_pool_forward(x, w, b, conv_param, pool_param)[0], b, dout)
print(’Testing conv_relu_pool’)
print(’dx error: ’, rel_error(dx_num, dx))
print(’dw error: ’, rel_error(dw_num, dw))
print(’db error: ’, rel_error(db_num, db))
In [ ]: from code_base.layer_utils import conv_relu_forward, conv_relu_backward
np.random.seed(231)
x = np.random.randn(2, 3, 8, 8)
w = np.random.randn(3, 3, 3, 3)
b = np.random.randn(3,)
dout = np.random.randn(2, 3, 8, 8)
conv_param = {’stride’: 1, ’pad’: 2}
out, cache = conv_relu_forward(x, w, b, conv_param)
dx, dw, db = conv_relu_backward(dout, cache)
dx_num = eval_numerical_gradient_array(lambda x: conv_relu_forward(x, w, b, conv_param)[0], x, dout)
dw_num = eval_numerical_gradient_array(lambda w: conv_relu_forward(x, w, b, conv_param)[0], w, dout)
db_num = eval_numerical_gradient_array(lambda b: conv_relu_forward(x, w, b, conv_param)[0], b, dout)
print(’Testing conv_relu:’)
print(’dx error: ’, rel_error(dx_num, dx))
print(’dw error: ’, rel_error(dw_num, dw))
print(’db error: ’, rel_error(db_num, db))
10 Three-layer ConvNet
Now that you have implemented all the necessary layers, we can put them together into a simple convolutional
network.
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Open the file code base/classifiers/cnn.py and complete the implementation of the
ThreeLayerConvNet class. Run the following cells to help you debug:
11 Sanity check loss
After you build a new network, one of the first things you should do is sanity check the loss. When we use
the softmax loss, we expect the loss for random weights (and no regularization) to be about log(C) for C
classes. When we add regularization this should go up.
In [ ]: model = ThreeLayerConvNet()
N = 50
X = np.random.randn(N, 3, 32, 32)
y = np.random.randint(10, size=N)
loss, grads = model.loss(X, y)
print(’Initial loss (no regularization): ’, loss)
model.reg = 0.5
loss, grads = model.loss(X, y)
print(’Initial loss (with regularization): ’, loss)
12 Gradient check
After the loss looks reasonable, use numeric gradient checking to make sure that your backward pass is
correct. When you use numeric gradient checking you should use a small amount of artifical data and a
small number of neurons at each layer. Note: correct implementations may still have relative errors up to
1e-2.
In [ ]: num_inputs = 2
input_dim = (3, 16, 16)
reg = 0.0
num_classes = 10
np.random.seed(231)
X = np.random.randn(num_inputs, *input_dim)
y = np.random.randint(num_classes, size=num_inputs)
model = ThreeLayerConvNet(num_filters=3, filter_size=3,
input_dim=input_dim, hidden_dim=7,
dtype=np.float64)
loss, grads = model.loss(X, y)
for param_name in sorted(grads):
f = lambda _: model.loss(X, y)[0]
param_grad_num = eval_numerical_gradient(f, model.params[param_name], verbose=False, h=1e-6)
e = rel_error(param_grad_num, grads[param_name])
print(’%s max relative error: %e’ % (param_name, rel_error(param_grad_num, grads[param_name])))
13 Solver
Following a modular design, for this assignment we have split the logic for training models into a separate
class. Open the file code base/solver.py and read through it to familiarize yourself with the API. We have
provided the functions for the various optimization techniques such as sgd and Adam.
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14 Overfit small data
A nice trick is to train your model with just a few training samples to check that your code is working. You
should be able to overfit small datasets, which will result in very high training accuracy and comparatively
low validation accuracy.
In [ ]: np.random.seed(231)
num_train = 100
small_data = {
’X_train’: data[’X_train’][:num_train],
’y_train’: data[’y_train’][:num_train],
’X_val’: data[’X_val’],
’y_val’: data[’y_val’],
}
model = ThreeLayerConvNet(weight_scale=1e-2)
solver = Solver(model, small_data,
num_epochs=15, batch_size=50,
update_rule=’adam’,
optim_config={
’learning_rate’: 1e-3,
},
verbose=True, print_every=1)
solver.train()
Plotting the loss, training accuracy, and validation accuracy should show clear overfitting:
In [ ]: plt.subplot(2, 1, 1)
plt.plot(solver.loss_history, ’o’)
plt.xlabel(’iteration’)
plt.ylabel(’loss’)
plt.subplot(2, 1, 2)
plt.plot(solver.train_acc_history, ’-o’)
plt.plot(solver.val_acc_history, ’-o’)
plt.legend([’train’, ’val’], loc=’upper left’)
plt.xlabel(’epoch’)
plt.ylabel(’accuracy’)
plt.show()
15 Train the net on full CIFAR2 data
By training the three-layer convolutional network for one epoch, you should achieve about 80% on the
validation set. You may have to wait about 2 minutes for training to be completed.
In [ ]: model = ThreeLayerConvNet(weight_scale=0.001, hidden_dim=500, reg=0.001)
solver = Solver(model, data,
num_epochs=1, batch_size=50,
update_rule=’adam’,
optim_config={
’learning_rate’: 1e-3,
},
10
verbose=True, print_every=20)
solver.train()
16 Visualize Filters
You can visualize the first-layer convolutional filters from the trained network by running the following:
In [ ]: from code_base.vis_utils import visualize_grid
grid = visualize_grid(model.params[’W1’].transpose(0, 2, 3, 1))
plt.imshow(grid.astype(’uint8’))
plt.axis(’off’)
plt.gcf().set_size_inches(5, 5)
plt.show()
17 Dropout
Dropout [1] is a technique for regularizing neural networks by randomly setting some features to zero during
the forward pass. In this exercise you will implement a dropout layer and modify your fully-connected
network to optionally use dropout.
[1] Geoffrey E. Hinton et al, “Improving neural networks by preventing co-adaptation of feature detectors”, arXiv 2012
18 Dropout forward pass
In the file code base/layers.py, implement the forward pass for dropout. Since dropout behaves differently
during training and testing, make sure to implement the operation for both modes. Refer to slide 19 of lecture
5 for the implementation details. p refers to the probability of setting a neuron to zero. We will follow the
Caffe convention where we multiply the outputs by 1/(1-p) during training.
FOR SUBMISSION: Submit the corresponding output from your forward dropout for the given input
arguments.
Inputs: – x: Input data. The array in the given csv file is presented in 2D, no reshaping is required –
dropout param: A dictionary with the following keys: – p: Dropout parameter. We drop each neuron output
with probability p. – mode: ‘test’ or ‘train’. If the mode is train, then perform dropout; if the mode is test,
then just return the input.
Since we cannot control the random seed used for randomly dropping the nodes across all programming
languages, there is no unique output for this code. What we will check is whether your output makes sense
for the given p dropout value.
In [ ]: x = np.loadtxt(’./input_files/dropout_forward_in_x.csv’)
# Larger p means more dropout
p = 0.3
out_train, _ = dropout_forward(x, {’mode’: ’train’, ’p’: p})
out_test, _ = dropout_forward(x, {’mode’: ’test’, ’p’: p})
np.savetxt(’./output_files/dropout_forward_out_train.csv’, out_train)
np.savetxt(’./output_files/dropout_forward_out_test.csv’, out_test)
19 Dropout backward pass
In the file code base/layers.py, implement the backward pass for dropout. After doing so, run the following
cell to numerically gradient-check your implementation.
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FOR SUBMISSION: Submit the corresponding output from your backward dropout for the given
input arguments.
In [ ]: dout = np.loadtxt(’./input_files/dropout_backward_in_dout.csv’)
x = np.loadtxt(’./input_files/dropout_backward_in_x.csv’)
dropout_param = {’mode’: ’train’, ’p’: 0.8}
out, cache = dropout_forward(x, dropout_param)
dx_train = dropout_backward(dout, cache)
np.savetxt(’./output_files/dropout_backward_out_train.csv’, dx_train)
dropout_param = {’mode’: ’test’, ’p’: 0.8}
out, cache = dropout_forward(x, dropout_param)
dx_test = dropout_backward(dout, cache)
np.savetxt(’./output_files/dropout_backward_out_test.csv’, dx_test)
20 Train your best three-layer net!
Using the ThreeLayerConvNet architecture, tweak the hyperparameters and use what you’ve learnt to
train the best net. For Python users, use the pre-processed (mean-normalized) CIFAR2 data provided here. For users of other languages, you can download the data from the CIFAR10 website:
https://www.cs.toronto.edu/˜kriz/cifar.html, and use just the airplane and bird classes for CIFAR2.
Keep to the same number of layers, but you are free to use more feature maps, hidden nodes, dropout
layers etc. Credits will be given based on your test accuracy and your explanations of your network architecture and training method. Please do not use a GPU, you should be able to train a small net to gain
insights. You should not need to wait half a day for the training to complete. The accuracy performance is
not a major component of the grade.
Please report the following: – Training and test accuracy over iterations – Architecture and training
method (eg. optimization scheme, data augmentation): explain your design choices, what has failed and
what has worked and why you think they worked/failed – Try different dropout rates and report their
performance
Use only the code you have written and any helper functions provided in this assignment. Do not use
external libraries like Tensorflow and Pytorch.
21 Final submission instructions
Please submit the following:
1) Your code files in a folder code base
2) Output files to the functions in output files
3) A short report (1-2 pages) in pdf titled report.pdf, explaining the logic (expressed using mathematical
expressions) behind coding each function and the findings from training your best net
Do not include the CIFAR data files as it takes up substantial memory. Please zip up the following
folders under a folder named with your NUSNET ID: eg. ‘e0123456g.zip’ and submit the zipped folder to
IVLE/workbin/assignment 2 submission.
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