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CS3100/5100: Data Structures and Algorithms Programming Assignment #4 solved

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1 Project Description
For this assignment, each student will implement a chaining Hash Table. The key used for the
operations specified as follows will be short strings, for example, the American last names in
the attached file. Assume a string consists of k characters. s[i] represents the i-th character
from left to right. We will try two hash code functions for strings: “djb2” and “sdbm” (http:
//www.cse.yorku.ca/%7eoz/hash.html) for chaining hash table. The actual hash function is
H(s) = djb2(s)modM or H(s) = sdbm(s)modM. M is the size of the hash table. M is better
chosen to be a prime number between n and 2n, where n is the total number of strings. Here, we
chose M to be 88799 or 88801.
In the beginning of your main() function, you should create a Hash Table. Then you should open
the input file, read the file that contain the strings of last names, and insert them into the Hash
Table using the insertion method for Hash Table. You should start with an empty Hash Table
while inserting all the strings into the Hash Table. After all the strings are inserted into the Hash
Table, print the number of occupied buckets in the Hash Table, and the load factor to the screen.
You then should implement a user interface (MENU) that supports the following operations:
• Insert new Entry: prompt user for a last name, insert it into the Hash Table. Your implementation should detect the insertion of a duplicated last name and reject the insertion. Display
information telling whether or not the insertion is successful; if successful, display the bucket
number that the last name is inserted.
• Delete an Entry: Ask the user for a last name and delete it from the Hash Table. Display
information telling whether or not the deletion is successful. If successful, display the last
name and the corresponding bucket number. Display information telling the delete is not
successful, i.e., last name: not found.
• Search: Search for a last name given via the keyboard. If successful, display the last name
and the bucket number that the last name is found. If not found, display information telling
the search is not successful, i.e., last name: not found.
• Logfile: Write a formatted display of the hash table to the log file. The display should list
each bucket of the Hash Table, indicating that the bucket is empty, or showing the key value.
• Quit.
The graduate students should implement two extra operations for the Hash Table:
• Delete a batch size of 20000, 40000, 60000, 80000 strings from the Hash Table respectively.
The different batch size of the inputs should be generated randomly, i.e, you should use a
random shuffle function to shuffle the list of input strings, then choose the first 20000, 40000,
60000, 80000 strings to delete one by one. You can use random shuffle() function in C++
STL to randomly shuffle the list of strings. Please check the online reference about the
random shuffle() function in C++ STL. For this delete operation, you should start with a
Hash Table having all strings inserted. Write a record into a file for each delete. This record
contains information telling whether or not the deletion is successful. If successful, display
the bucket that the last name is deleted.
• Search a batch size of 20000, 40000, 60000, 80000 strings from the Hash Table respectively.
The different batch size of the inputs should be generated randomly, i.e, you should use a
random shuffle function to shuffle the list of input strings, then choose the first 20000, 40000,
60000, 80000 strings to search one by one. Again, you can use random shuffle() function in
C++ STL to randomly shuffle the list of string. For this search operation, you should start
with a Hash Table having all strings inserted. Write a record into a file for each search. The
record for each search contains information telling whether or not the search is successful. If
successful, display the last name and the bucket that the last name is found.
Running your program should produce a menu similar to the one shown in the example below.
When loading a file with strings from the disk, all current entries in the Hash Table should be
deleted, and the Hash table should be rebuilt.
MENU
(I)nsert new Entry
(D)elete Entry
(S)earch by last name
(L)ogfile
(Q)uit
You should implement both hash code functions. For the two different hash code functions, different
log files will be generated. Try to compare the log files generated by using the two different hash
code functions, including the length of the longest linked list of all the hash table bucket in the
hash table, the number of empty hash table buckets. In other words, among the hash table based
on these two hash code function, which hash table will have better performance for the given input.
Try to write a simple report, and you should draw figures for comparison purpose in your report.
The graduate students should have two extra operations implemented. The graduate student should
also measure the running time of deleting and searching for different batch sizes, and report the
running time using a table or a figure. For each batch size, you should repeat running the program
for each batch size for 10 times. After you get the running time for each run, calculate the average
running time for each batch size for delete and search respectively (In other words, after you get
the running time (ci) for each run, calculate the mean µ, µ = 1/n Pn
i=1 ci
. ) If you choose to use
figures to report the running time, then x-axis should be the batch size, and y-axis should be the
running time. You should provide two figures, one for delete, and one for search. You can use any
tool to generate the figure, such as excel, matlab, and gnuplot, etc.
You can use the following code segment to measure the execution time of a piece of code. There are
other functions that can be used to measure execution time, and you are free to use other functions.
# include < ctime >
……
clock t start = clock();
2
the piece of code that you want to measure the time
clock t end = clock();
double duration = (end − start)/CLOCKS PER SEC;
“duration” is the execution time in seconds spent on the piece of code. If the number is too small,
use duration = end−start instead. But you should use the same setting cross different experiments
to make the running time comparable.
2 Requirements
1. In order to use the c++ compiler environment installed under the school’s unix server,
unixapps1.wright.edu, you need to connect to this unix server remotely using a secure shell
client, putty. You can remotely connect to this unix server, unixapps1.wright.edu, on campus
from a Wright State computer or use your own laptop connecting to the WSU wifi network
named WSU-Secure. Note that you cannot remotely connect to this computer using a secure
shell client using computers outside Wright State University without installing VPN or use
the campus WSU EZ CONNECT wifi network.
2. You must submit an ELECTRONIC COPY of your source program through Pilot before the
due date. If for some reason Pilot is unavailable, submit your source code to the instructor
Meilin Liu.
3. Your main program should create a user interface similar to the example above. The file
name for the main program should be lab4.cpp.
4. Submit all your source codes (LinkedNode.h, SList.h, SList.cpp, HashTable.h, HashTable.cpp,
and lab4.cpp), makefile, possibly a README file, and any other required files. You are
recommended to explain your programs clearly in the README file.
5. All the submitted project files should have: Course Number / Course Title, Your Name,
Prof.s Name, Date, and the Project Name. If you did not include these required contents in
your submitted files, then 5 points will be deducted. You also need to submit a makefile or a
compiling command to compile your source codes. If not, another 5 points will be deducted.
6. The instructor will test your programs under WSU’s UNIX environment, e.g.,unixapps1.wright.edu.
It is YOUR responsibility to make your programs workable and runnable by others under
school’s UNIX environment.
7. The programming assignment is individual. You must do the project by yourself. If you allow
others to copy your programs or answers, you will get the same punishment as those who
copy yours.
3 Hash code functions
The two hash code functions are attached here too. Again, you are encouraged to check the original
website (http://www.cse.yorku.ca/%7eoz/hash.html) for these two hash code functions.
3
djb2: This algorithm (k=33) was first reported by dan bernstein many years ago in comp.lang.c.
Another version of this algorithm (now favored by bernstein) uses xor: hash(i) = hash(i−1)∗33str[i]
;
the magic of number 33 (why it works better than many other constants, prime or not) has never
been adequately explained.
• Psuedo code:
unsigned long
hash(unsigned char *str)
{
unsigned long hash = 5381;
int c;
while (c = *str++)
hash = ((hash << 5) + hash) + c; /* hash * 33 + c */ return hash; } sdbm: This algorithm was created for sdbm (a public-domain re-implementation of ndbm) database library. It was found to do well in scrambling bits, causing better distribution of the keys and fewer splits. It also happens to be a good general hashing function with good distribution. The actual function is hash(i) = hash(i − 1) ∗ 65599 + str[i]; what is included below is the faster version used in gawk. [there is even a faster, duff-device version] the magic constant 65599 was picked out of thin air while experimenting with different constants, and turns out to be a prime. this is one of the algorithms used in berkeley db (see sleepycat) and elsewhere. • Pseudo code: static unsigned long sdbm(str) unsigned char *str; { unsigned long hash = 0; int c; while (c = *str++) hash = c + (hash << 6) + (hash << 16) - hash; return hash; } 4